What being Kinky says about your mental health.

Now here’s something you probably never associated with kinky sex: Increased mental health. 

If it wasn’t for mainstream erotica and softcore pornography (looking at you, “ Fifty shades of grey”), most people probably would not have realised there’s a whole world of boundary experimentation in the bedroom. And if it wasn’t for anonymous sex studies, we probably would not have known just how many people have tried – and liked – being adventurous in the bedroom. 

Truth be told, the odds are that at least some of your friends have tried it – and you’d be surprised to learn that for at least 1 out of 5, kink is a regular bedroom act. A 2015 sexual exploration in america study has found role-play is engaged by more than 22 percent of sexually active adults, at the same time more than 20 percent have engaged in being tied up and spanked. 

If this wasn’t surprising enough, another study with 1040 participants found that nearly half were interested in kink – even if they’ve never had the opportunity to explore it. The growing list of research on kink has found that engaging in it has benefits not just for your mental health but also for your relationship. 

A 2013 study first published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, found that BDSM practitioners may be better of psychologically than the general public. 

The study revealed that at least on a basic level there where no indications that BDSM practitioners are more troubled than the general population. In fact, they appeared to be more extroverted, more open to new experiences and more conscientious on all accounts. Interestingly the study also found that they were less neurotic, a personality trait that’s usually linked with anxiety.

Practitioners of kink also scored much lower when it comes to rejection sensitivity, a measure of just how likely people are to be paranoid about others disliking them. Active kink practitioners in the study also reported higher levels of well-being during the past two weeks to those who are not. Researchers also found them more likely to report a higher level in secure feelings of attachment in their relationships.

Photo by christian buehner on Unsplash

Of the BDSM practitioners, 33 percent of the men reported being submissive, 48 percent dominant and 18 percent “switch,” or willing to switch between submissive and dominant roles in bed. About 75 percent of the female BDSM respondents were submissive, 8 percent dominant and 16 percent switch.

Now that you know it’s science-approved you too can explore the kinkier side of life, and that does not necessitate leather and whips. The definition of kink will be different to all couples, and that’s totally normal . It’s really as simple as seeing what happens when you break from your regular bedroom routine.

Time to get naughty!

FURTHER READING

Keen to explore the kink side of life? Check out these awesome books below.